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Guide to GB domestic drivers’ hours rules

If you are not familiar with GB domestic drivers’ hours rules or just need a refresher this guide will give you the basic information you need.

Drivers of vehicles that fall outside the scope of the EU drivers’ hours rules are covered by the GB domestic drivers’ hours rules.  This includes vehicles working in the following areas:

    • Vans not exceeding 3.5 tonnes
    • Tradesmen (e.g. building / construction);
    • Passenger transport (operating on regular routes up to 31 miles (50km)).
    • NHS & publicly owned medical vehicles;
    • Refuse collection;
    • Local authority services for the elderly & disabled;
    • Milk (not including bulk milk tankers);
    • Utilities & road maintenance (e.g. gas / water);
    • Breakdown;
    • Agricultural, fishing and forestry (used within a 62 mile (100km) radius from the base of operations);
    • Charity work (where employed drivers are used);
    • Special vehicles (e.g. vehicles that operate on natural gas, electric or are not capable of speeds over 24mph (40km/h));
    • “Gritters” – vehicles designed for the spreading of rock salt directly onto roads/pavements.

The main limits and requirements for goods vehicle drivers are:

    • 10 hours maximum daily driving;
    • 11 hours maximum daily duty.

The main limits and requirements for passenger vehicle drivers are:

    • 10 hours maximum daily driving;
    • 16 hours maximum daily duty;
    • 10 hours daily rest;
    • No weekly rest requirement;
    • At least one period of 24 hours off duty in any two consecutive weeks.

There are exceptions to the above. For example domestic drivers’ hours regulations do not apply in an emergency situation. For a Goods vehicle this is set out in regulation 2 of the Drivers’ Hours (Goods Vehicles) (Exemptions) Regulations 1986 (SI 1986/1492).

“Events which cause or are likely to cause danger to life / health of humans or animals; serious interruption to infrastructure (such as water, gas, etc); serious interruption to roads, railways, ports or airport AND the event necessitates the taking of immediate action to prevent / continuance of the danger or interruption OR events likely to cause serious damage to property.”  

For passenger vehicles it is set out in regulation 2 of the Drivers’ Hours (Passenger Vehicles) (Exemptions) Regulations 1970 (SI 1970/145).

“Events which cause or are likely to cause danger to life / health of one or more individuals; serious interruption to infrastructure (such as water, gas, etc); serious interruption to roads, or to private or public transport; serious damage to property AND the event necessitates the taking of immediate action to prevent / continuance of the danger or interruption.”

In addition to this a Minister, by regulation, may create exemptions to the limits, dispense with the requirement to observe the enforcement of the regulations or grant certificates which confirms that any particular case fell within an exemption created by the regulation to enable drivers to deal with cases of emergency or otherwise to meet a special need. The Traffic Commissioners can also grant exemptions on an individual basis and they can be provided retrospectively.

For further information on the rules and exemptions see https://www.gov.uk/

If you are unsure of anything seek advice and Smartanalysis users should contact servicedesk@descartes.com

 

Posted on: 19.12.2014

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